Photogrammetry and 3D-Modelling

United Kingdom - Following a number of technical breakthroughs in recent years, photogrammetry has come to the fore as a technique for the 3D-modelling of buildings and structures. Aided by the use of drones, the technique is now coming into widespread use across a range of professional disciplines, and the Building Information Modelling (BIM) and GIS teams at Arcadis have been leading the way in developing photogrammetry and 3D-Modelling consultancy services for a range of clients across the business.

Zero

access constraints

Significant

time and cost savings

Photogrammetry achieves 3D-modelling of structures by employing a principle known as “stereo-imaging”. This is where two-images placed side-by-side can be viewed simultaneously, thereby creating a 3-dimensional aspect. When this theory is applied on a grand-scale by aligning multiple images through algorithm based computer processing, the resulting 3D-Model can be rotated, explored, enquired and annotated. 

The technique dates from the 19th Century and over the past 15 years has been developed for documentation and engineering purposes. However, more significant breakthroughs with algorithm processing in the last five years has made it possible to achieve rapid modelling with limited budget, time or resource layout.  
Photogrammetry
The Arcadis team has been developing this technique for a variety of purposes, covering engineering, condition-survey and documentation, drawing from a diverse range of experience and professional development studies. At the same time, the team is also developing its building modelling consultancy to include integrated photogrammetry, laser-scanning, Lidar-mapping and 360 photography – all of which will assist with project planning throughout the lifecycle of any scheme. 

The team will address project requirements by providing an integrated package combining low-cost survey and modelling techniques, such as photogrammetry, 360 photography, topography survey and GIS with intensive detailed modelling such as laser-scanning and reconstruction through Virtual Reality (VR) to produce the ideal end product. 

At an initial level, these processes can help to deliver significant savings thanks to rapid documentation and by removing access constraints for hand-surveys, as well as more detailed modelling of existing elements in construction programmes. The end results can be seen through web-based viewers, from which technical drawings such as facades, elevations and plan-drawings can be generated. These can be further geo-referenced to within appropriate tolerances for the project aims.

Outcomes

Zero

access constraints

Significant

time and cost savings

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